Hydrate, hydrate and hydrate some more!

. Posted in FPH, Journey to Healthy Aging Blog

 – By Alison Kennedy Hand

From March 11-17, we’re celebrating Nutrition and Hydration Week for 2019. There’s no better time than now to emphasize the importance of drinking water.

An individual can use or lose more fluid than is taken in. Not replacing the lost fluids is called dehydration. Anyone can become dehydrated, but older adults are at greater risk for dehydration due to a variety of reasons.

Some causes of dehydration are chronic diseases, swallowing problems, medication usage, kidney deficiency with age, and decreased taste bud sensation. Thirst isn’t always a good indicator of the body’s need for water. Some people, particularly older adults, don’t feel thirsty until they are already dehydrated.

Here are some important signs or symptoms of dehydration: dry mouth, dry skin, extreme thirst, confusion, irritability, sunken eyes, difficulty walking, dizziness, headaches, inability to sweat, rapid heart rate, constipation, low blood pressure, dark urine or decreased urine output.

How does a person avoid dehydration?

  • Drink plenty of fluids!
  • Avoid caffeinated beverages and alcohol as these types of drinks cause a person to urinate more.
  • Eat more fruit with a high-water content such as grapes, watermelon, peaches, and berries or water rich vegetables such as tomatoes, lettuce, and summer squash.
  • Drink more during the day and limit drinking before bed. Drinking small amounts of water routinely throughout the day can help.

And remember, older adults can become dehydrated during minor illnesses such as with a bladder infection or bronchitis. It’s important to recognize this and make an effort to drink extra fluids even when you’re not feeling well.

Resident John Moen Awarded Wellness Star for March

. Posted in FPH, Journey to Healthy Aging Blog, News

Florida Presbyterian Homes is pleased to announce John Moen as the winner of the Wellness Star for March 2019. This month’s wellness star focuses on the intellectual and vocational dimensions of wellness. The intellectual dimension is defined as engaging in creative pursuits and intellectually stimulating activities, whereas, the vocational dimension is defined as work that utilizes a person’s skills while providing personal satisfaction.

Photography is a creative work of art for John Moen. It provides a high level of personal satisfaction for both John and his wife, Christina (Chris). John says his photography started when he developed a website called worldatlas.com. John and Chris would travel around the world visiting many countries together. John would take pictures and Chris would write articles about each country. The information was then shared through the world atlas website.

As the Moen’s journeyed around the world, John amassed a collection of photos totaling around 20,000! Once John sold the website, he wasn’t sure what to do with all the photos, but soon noticed there was a market for his photo collection. He began selling the photos online using various techniques to make the pictures more attractive.

“I work because I enjoy it, and I attribute a lot of my success to my wife,” said John. “I feel very lucky to have a wife like Chris who enjoys traveling.” In addition to their travel, the Moens have  lived in unique destinations around the world such as Rome, Amsterdam and Prague. John says photography is self-gratifying and very fulfilling to his life. “There is something special about creating work that people like and enjoy,” said John.

When asked what wellness means to him, John replied, “It’s getting a good night’s sleep, having good healthcare, and most importantly, having happy relationships with people — especially a good marriage.”

Congratulations to John for winning the March Wellness Star.

Tobacco Free Campus Coming Soon

. Posted in Events, FPH, Journey to Healthy Aging Blog, News

Florida Presbyterian Homes will be a tobacco free campus with tobacco free shifts by November 15, 2019. Being tobacco free creates a healthier environment for the residents, employees and guests.

YOU + ME = TOBACCO FREE!

In anticipation of the move to being tobacco free, the following resources are available to help tobacco users to quit:

  • Tobacco Free Florida: www.TobaccoFreeFlorida.com; 1-877-822-6669
  • Employee Assistance Program (EAP): 1-866-640-2772
  • Ignite Your Life Coaching Program (Breathe Easy): www.CallToHealth.org; 1-800-773-7752
  • American Lung Association: www.Lung.org/stop-smoking/; 1-800-LUNGUSA
  • On Site Employee Smoking Cessation Program (FPH Wellness Dept.): 863-577-6022; akennedy@fphi.org

Florida Presbyterian Homes is committed to promoting good health for everyone. Join us in our efforts to be tobacco free!

Study Shows Greater Risk in Being Sedentary

. Posted in Journey to Healthy Aging Blog

By Alison Kennedy Hand, FPH Wellness Director

Recently, we learned about an important study found in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This study showed that a sedentary lifestyle was worse than smoking, diabetes and heart disease. A senior author of the study, Cleveland Clinic cardiologist Dr. Wael Jaber, said, “being unfit on a treadmill or in an exercise stress test, has a worse prognosis, as far as death, than being hypertensive, diabetic or being a current smoker.”

This is important to know as we age, especially when some seniors think physical activity isn’t as important as it was when they were young. Dr. Jaber said he has never seen research as pronounced and as objective as this. The study essentially proves that being sedentary, also known as unfit, should be considered as strong of a risk factor as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, if not stronger than all of them.

The study reported in JAMA looked at 122,007 patients who had an exercise treadmill test between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 2014 to measure all cause of mortality relating to the benefits of exercise. The study showed that fitness leads to longer life and that the benefits of exercise were seen with all ages in both men and women.

When looking at the risk of death, a sedentary lifestyle or being unfit, was worse than the other risk factors such as smoking or end stage disease. In fact, the researchers report compared the risk of sitting against high performers on a treadmill test and found that the mortality risk of a sedentary lifestyle is three times greater than smoking. THREE TIMES GREATER!

What does this study tell Americans? We need to get up and move more. Being sedentary is bad for your health!

 

Source: AMA Network Open, October 19, 2018.doi:10.1001/jamanet-workopen.2018.3605

Cardiology Abstract By: Kyle Mandsager, MD; Serge Harb, MD; Paul Cremer, MD; etc.

February Wellness Star Awarded to Carol Kahlenberg

. Posted in FPH, Journey to Healthy Aging Blog, News

Florida Presbyterian Homes has named resident Carol Kahlenberg as the Wellness Star for February 2019. This month’s wellness star focused on the physical and intellectual dimension of wellness. The intellectual dimension can be defined as engaging in creative pursuits and intellectually stimulating activities to keep the mind alert.

Kahlenberg started taking Tai Chi class about two years ago. She was one of the first to take the Tai Chi for Arthritis class. She continues in Tai Chi and has added Qigong for Health to her routine. Each class meets once a week.

Kahlenberg says she benefits tremendously from going to the classes. By taking the Tai Chi class, she has learned to relax and calm herself by learning to focus on movements and stay in the moment. “If I’m going through a hard time,” says Kahlenberg, “it doesn’t bother me as much because I know how to put moments into perspective.”

Tai Chi has helped Kahlenberg to be more focused with activities such as reading and prayer. Plus, she has gained better balance and strength in her legs — relying minimally on her cane. “Stairs used to be difficult for me, but I’m now able to do them without fear,” said Kahlenberg.

When asked what wellness means to her, Kahlenberg replied, “Wellness means body, mind and spirit.”

And it is with great spirit that we congratulate Carol for winning this month’s star. We applaud her commitment to wellness and her willingness to share her experience with us!

Practicing Proper Cold and Flu Etiquette this Season

. Posted in Journey to Healthy Aging Blog

By Alison Kennedy, FPH Wellness Director

Germs like the flu virus can spread with a simple touch or through the air. Experts believe that viruses predominantly spread through droplets expelled when sick people cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets have the potential to make their way to the mouths or noses of people who are nearby, as well as on any surface. Using good manners at the table and when in the company of others — such as coughing or sneezing into a napkin — can help prevent the spread of germs.

Here are some helpful tips to keep you and others well through the winter months:

  • Stay Home – If you are sick, the best thing to do is stay home until you are no longer contagious. Do everything you can to avoid contact with others.
  • Hand Washing – Wash your hands frequently throughout the day. You may have picked up some germs from touching doorknobs, computer keyboards or a phone. Lather your hands and wrists with soap for at least 20 seconds and rinse. Keep a bottle of hand sanitizer in your pocket or purse. If you can’t get to a sink, use the hand sanitizer.
  • Tissues – Have a stash of tissues in your home and car. Keep a travel pack in your purse or pocket. When you feel a sneeze or coughing attack about to happen, simply cover your mouth and nose with a tissue. As soon as possible, find a sink and wash your hands. If you don’t have a tissue, bend your elbow and cough or sneeze into the crook of your arm. Sounds funny, but it works!
  • Cleanliness – Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects within your control – counters, doorknobs, handles, TV remote and sink faucets. Wash pillowcases, washcloths and towels more frequently and in hot water.
  • Coughing Fit – Keep cough drops, mints, water or a travel mug of hot tea with you. If you still can’t control the situation, quietly step out of the room until you can soothe your cough.
  • Don’t Share – It’s best to avoid sharing food, utensils, beverage containers, towels, lipstick or anything else that might be contaminated with cold and flu germs.

By practicing your best cold and flu etiquette, you will help to stop the spread of germs this winter. And your friends and family will thank you for it!

Source: Reader’s Digest, Everyday Wellness by Kelsey Kloss

Diane Van Dusen Named as January Wellness Star

. Posted in FPH, Journey to Healthy Aging Blog, News

Florida Presbyterian Homes is pleased to award the January 2019 Wellness Star to resident Diane Van Dusen. This month’s wellness star focuses on the physical dimension of wellness, which promotes proper care of our bodies for optimal health and functioning. There are many aspects to physical wellness including physical activity, nutrition and mental well-being.

Diane Van Dusen is a great example of physical wellness and has been active her entire life. As a teenager in high school, she was a swimmer, cheerleader, tennis player and water skier. She says she enjoyed the water skiing most and performed at Cypress Gardens during high school and summer breaks from college. While attending Florida State University, she was in a synchronized swimming group, which according to Van Dusen, “was a lot of hard work!”

As an adult, Van Dusen continued to stay active as a member of a local health club and the YMCA. She enjoyed use of the jogging track at the health club and participated in group exercise classes. When Van Dusen moved to FPH three years ago, she found it most convenient to participate in the group exercise classes at the McArthur Center on the FPH campus.

Van Dusen believes it’s important for older adults to get out and join something. “Be active,” she says. “Because if you don’t use it, you will lose it!”

When asked what wellness means to her, Van Dusen said, “Wellness means taking care of yourself, which involves fitness. It’s a new year and we can all find ways to be more active.”

Florida Presbyterian’s Wellness Program Provides Ideal Setting for Outpatient Rehab

. Posted in FPH, Journey to Healthy Aging Blog

There’s a hidden gem located along a tree-lined street on the campus of Florida Presbyterian Homes (FPH) in Lakeland, FL. That gem is a state-of-the-art rehabilitation gym located in the McArthur Center, adjacent to the Porter McGrath Building on Lakeside Avenue. The gym is one component of an active wellness program that is open to both FPH residents and rehab referrals.

Just ask Dan Hoover, a 74-year-old Lakeland resident who uses the gym about three days per week and has found it to be just the right prescription for his own cardiac rehabilitation.

“The equipment in this gym is far better than most other rehab facilities,” said Hoover, who experienced a heart attack in 2003 and had a stent placed in 2016 due to a blocked artery. “I started at FPH’s gym this past April when my former cardiac rehab location closed down. I tried a few gyms around town before I found the FPH gym, but nothing compared. The FPH wellness program provides me with everything I need to rehab – from personalized attention to a wider range of rehab equipment.”

FPH’s gym houses HUR strength equipment, which is designed to provide older adults with a total body workout. The gym has cardio-specific equipment, such as treadmills, elliptical, stationary bikes, recumbent bikes, NuStep and row machines.

There’s also a simple SMART card system so program members can personalize their workouts according to their individual rehab needs, track their progress and report performance.

“The wellness director, Alison Kennedy, takes time to create an individualized plan for each person” said Hoover. “She does a great job. She reviews your health history, tells you what machines will help you and monitors your progress, adjusting as you go.” Kennedy collaborates with the physical therapists in FPH’s rehabilitation dept. to make sure the wellness program is in line with what patients need as they move from inpatient therapy to outpatient recovery.

Hoover said his insurance initially paid for 36 visits of cardiac rehab, but he is now on his own to pay for services out of pocket. His doctor recommended he try the program at Florida Presbyterian Homes. “I know how important it is to continue my rehab,” said Hoover. “The FPH program is less expensive than other gyms and the atmosphere is friendlier. The hours are great, and everyone is courteous and works together.”

In addition to Hoover’s concerns about heart health, he also experiences pain due to arthritis and bursitis in his hip. “My doctor said, ‘Don’t you dare quit going to the gym. Exercise is what’s helping your pain, and if you don’t do it, the pain will get worse’,” said Hoover. He agrees with his doctor and feels much better after working out. Hoover even plans to increase his workouts to 4 or 5 times per week in the coming year. “They’ve got an excellent program over there. It’s a true gem.”

 

If you’re interested in learning more about the wellness program at Florida Presbyterian Homes, visit the Wellness page on the FPH website or contact Alison Kennedy, MS, at akennedy@fphi.org or (863) 577- 6022.

Gym Location

McArthur Center
811 Lakeside Avenue
Lakeland, FL 33803

Gym Hours of Operation

Monday – Friday 6:00am – 9:00pm
Saturday 7:30am – 9:00pm
Sunday 12:00pm – 9:00pm

Wellness Program Membership Fee

A monthly membership fee of $20 includes the use of the gym equipment, wellness workshops AND group exercise classes. All members must sign a waiver/release and policy & procedure form before joining the gym. New members are encouraged to schedule a gym orientation on proper use of the HUR equipment and SMART card system. Personal Training is available upon request. Please check with the wellness director on cost and availability.

Doing your Best to Beat the Holiday Blues

. Posted in Journey to Healthy Aging Blog

For most people, the holidays are a time of family gatherings, friends and happiness. Calendars are stacked full with shopping, parties and celebrations. But for some, this time of year can be just the opposite.

Holidays can be a source of the blues thinking about the loss of a loved one, the passing of time, poor health, chronic pain or concerns about money. All of these sad thoughts make it hard to enjoy the holidays. In fact, these feelings can lead to loneliness, sadness or depression, at a time when you least expect it. 

Here are a few tips to help cope with the holiday blues.

  1. Adjust your holiday expectations – Not every holiday will be same and be open to creating new traditions.
  2. Don’t be alone – Ask for help traveling to parties, social and religious events. 
  3. Pamper yourself – Use the holidays as an excuse to do something for you, like a spa day.
  4. Mark your calendar – Stick to your wellness routine of exercise, healthy eating and getting plenty of sleep.
  5. Drink responsibly – Don’t over indulge during the holidays because too much alcohol can make one feel more depressed.
  6. Accept your feelings – If you have lost a loved one, recognize your feelings of sadness and grief as being normal.
  7. Talk about your situation – Don’t isolate yourself, but talk with friends, family or clergy about your feelings.

Holiday blues are mild and should only be temporary, but depression is serious and lasting. Signs of depression are sadness that won’t lift, frequent crying, feeling restless, decreased energy, fatigue or trouble concentrating. Recognize the signs and take action. If you or your loved one feels the situation is more than just holiday blues, talk to your healthcare provider. Remember, depression is not only common, but it’s also treatable.  

 

 

** Information provided by the Health in Aging Foundation, 11/2015

Flower Ministry Volunteer Polly Carland Named December Wellness Star

. Posted in FPH, Journey to Healthy Aging Blog, News

Florida Presbyterian Homes is pleased to announce that Polly Carland has been awarded the Wellness Star for December 2018. 

This month’s award focuses on both the occupational and social dimensions of wellness. The occupational dimension can be defined as work that utilizes a person’s skills.  Whereas, the social dimension one’s ability to connect with other people. Carland is a great example of someone who uses both of these dimensions in her daily routine.

Since volunteering is such an important factor on the FPH campus, the flower ministry is just one example of residents serving residents. Carland has been participating in the flower ministry for seven years. “The FPH community has been good to me and it is important to find ways to serve others,” said Carland.  “By volunteering, it helps connect you with other residents, keeps you from being isolated, and provides simple acts of kindness.” 

Carland explained that Chapel flowers are taken apart and redistributed in vases as part of the flower ministry. It usually takes about 45 minutes to separate and prepare the flowers. The new arrangements are then taken by a team of flower ministry volunteers to the health center. Carland not only arranges the vases, but also helps to organize the team of volunteers who receive a flower delivery schedule. 

Carland says the FPH chapel is a sacred place and the flowers are part of the chapel. She is very happy the flowers continue to be enjoyed by people who need them. 

When asked what wellness means to her, Carland replied, “Wellness is the ability to live a long, happy, satisfying life.  FPH offers us that opportunity and how we respond to it is inside each of us.”

© 2014 Florida Presbyterian Homes
16 Lake Hunter Drive - Lakeland, FL 33803
Phone: 863-688-5521 or Marketing: 863-577-6001